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By 12 November 2012 | Categories: gizmos

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For companies dealing with electronic equipment, the problem of dealing with legacy equipment is a very real one. As technology evolves, in many cases the latest products fail to comply with standards set by older gear.
 
A practical example is the old RS-232 port, once very commonly found on PCs to connect to a range of peripherals including mice, printers, data storage and more. As better connectivity options have become available, it has become a relic of the past, replaced by the USB port as we know it today.
 
The solution to legacy problems
 
The problem appears when old equipment, such as printers, which only has these old RS-232 ports, need to be brought back into action. This is where Electrocomp’s USB to RS-232 adaptor cable turns into your new best friend. It provides a simple way of adapting legacy serial devices with RS-232 interfaces to the latest USB ports by incorporating a FTDI FT232R bridge chip.
 
Apart from a small internal electronic circuit board contained inside the cable, there are also RS-232 level shifters and TXD/RXD LEDs to visually indicate whether there is data traffic flowing through the adapter.
 
Once plugged into a USB port, you can download drivers from www.ftdichip.com, which should make the US232R appear as a Virtual COM Port (VCP). The port is mounted in a rugged plastic enclosure capable of withstanding industrial temperature changes, and is available in 10 cm or 1 m lengths.
 
Contact information

Electrocomp’s headquarters are situated in Linbro Business Park, with further branches located in Pretoria, Cape Town and Durban. Visit www.electrocomp.co.za for more information, or call 011-458-9000/32.
 

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