PREVIOUS ARTICLENEXT ARTICLE
NEWS
By 1 November 2012 | Categories: news

0

If there were any doubts as to the viability of 7” tablets in general, and the popularity of the Nexus 7 in particular, the latest news from Asus should dispel them.
 
According to the Wall Street Journal, Asustek chief financial officer David Chang has been quoted as stating that its 7” tablet, developed in partnership with Google, has racked up sales of close to one million in a single month.
 
Chang also stated that the tablet first started selling a substantial 500 000 units a month, and subsequently climbed to 600 000 and then 700 000.
 
The revelation apparently came at the company’s earnings report for the third quarter of 2012. As well as indicating a an increase in the adoption of the superb Android 4.1 tablet, it also showed that there is clearly a great deal of interest in the 7” tablet category.
 
Eye of the storm
 
The news comes in the wake of several noteworthy developments. The first of these is Google’s recent launch of a 32 GB Nexus 7 tablet that doubles the Nexus 7’s storage capacity, and a model which adds cellular capability to the Nexus 7’s features. Additionally, Google simultaneously launched its new Nexus 10 (manufactured by Samsung), a 10” tablet that drew battle line’s with Apple’s 4th generation iPad, by boasting an even higher resolution screen.
 
Additionally, the original Nexus 7’s sales figures further come in the midst of Apple’s entry into the smaller tablet category, with the launch of its iPad Mini, which many believed may well eclipse tablets like the Nexus 7 and Amazon’s Kindle Fire HD.
 
Content may be king, but price is its prince
 
Apparently, however, the Nexus 7 is still going strong. There is little doubt that price played its part – as the Nexus 7 came into the market with a $250 (R2 150) pricetag for the 16 GB model.
 
This pricepoint has now been occupied by the new 32 GB version, and leaves the 16 GB Nexus 7 priced at $200 (R1 720). Locally, the 16 GB Nexus entered the market at just below the R30 00 mark, which is not at all bad for a quad-core device.
 
Comparing this to the iPad Mini’s more expensive starting prices Stateside of $330 (R2 838) and $430 (R3 689) for the 16 GB and 32 GB versions respectively, and which ranges up to a more premium-level price of $659 (R5 680), and it is not hard to see the Nexus 7’s appeal for those on a budget.  
 
To the point
 
Apart from being exciting news for Asus, it is also good news for general users, as it indicates that there is still plenty room for a variety of players in the small-sized tablet space.
 
Competition, for users’ attention and their money, only spurs better innovation and further price drops, something that we suspect both iOS and Android fans will continue to welcome with open arms.  If there were any doubts as to the viability of 7” tablets in general, and the popularity of the Nexus 7 in particular, the latest news from Asus should dispel them.
 
According to the Wall Street Journal, Asustek chief financial officer David Chang has been quoted as stating that its 7” tablet, developed in partnership with Google, has racked up sales of close to one million in a single month.
 
Chang also states that the tablet first started selling a substantial 500 000 units a month, and subsequently climbed to 600 000 and then 700 000.
 
The revelation apparently came at the company’s earnings report for the third quarter of 2012. As well as indicating a an increase in the adoption of the superb Android 4.1 tablet, it also showed that there is clearly a great deal of interest in the 7” tablet category.
 
Eye of the storm
 
The news comes in the wake of several noteworthy developments. The first of these is Google’s recent launch of a 32 GB Nexus 7 tablet that doubles the Nexus 7’s storage capacity, and a model which adds cellular capability to the Nexus 7’s features. Additionally, Google simultaneously launched its new Nexus 10 (manufactured by Samsung), a 10” tablet that drew battle line’s with Apple’s 4th generation iPad, by boasting an even higher resolution screen.
 
Additionally, the original Nexus 7’s sales figures further come in the midst of Apple’s entry into the smaller tablet category, with the launch of its iPad Mini, which many believed may well eclipse tablets like the Nexus 7 and Amazon’s Kindle Fire HD.
 
Content may be king, but price is its prince
 
Apparently, however, the Nexus 7 is still going strong. There is little doubt that price played its part – as the Nexus 7 came into the market with a $250 (R2 150) pricetag for the 16 GB model. This pricepoint has now been occupied by the new 32 GB version, and leaves the 16 GB Nexus 7 priced at $200 (R1 720).
 
Locally, the 16 GB Nexus entered the market at just below the R3 000 mark, which is not at all bad for a quad-core device.
 
Comparing this to the iPad Mini’s more expensive starting prices Stateside of $330 (R2 838) and $430 (R3 689) for the 16 GB and 32 GB versions respectively, and which ranges up to a more premium-level price of $659 (R5 680), and it is not hard to see the Nexus 7’s appeal for those on a budget.  
 
To the point
 
Apart from being exciting news for Asus, it is also good news for general users, as it indicates that there is still plenty room for a variety of players in the small-sized tablet space.

Competition, for users’ attention and their money, only spurs better innovation and further price drops, something that we suspect both iOS and Android fans will continue to welcome with open arms.   

USER COMMENTS

Read
Magazine Online
TechSmart.co.za is South Africa's leading magazine for tech product reviews, tech news, videos, tech specs and gadgets.
Start reading now >
Download latest issue

Have Your Say


What new tech or developments are you most anticipating this year?
New smartphone announcements (8 votes)
Technological breakthroughs (11 votes)
Launch of new consoles, or notebooks (8 votes)
Innovative Artificial Intelligence solutions (7 votes)
Biotechnology or medical advancements (13 votes)
Better business applications (4 votes)